Genetically Modified Foods

Genetically Modified Foods

Genetic engineering is a process that involves transferring DNA from one organism into the DNA of another. By making changes in genetic information across species, scientists can give plants special characteristics such as that increases vitamin content and increased resistance to pests.
In US, the genetically engineered crops comprised 25 percent of the nation’s cropland, including 35 percent of all corn, 55 percent of all soybeans and 50 percent of all cotton. Many of these crops were exported.
Genetically engineered crops are being prefered by farmers as they create higher yields and lower production costs. They also decrease the need for pesticides.
Not everyone believes that this new technology is a good thing. Critics say weeds and pests could eventually adapt to the altered crops, requiring deadlier pesticides to eradicate them. Another worry is that native crop strains could be wiped out. Europe has not reacted as favorably to the use of the modified crops, requiring food labels to state whether a product contains genetically modified ingredients. United States does not require labeling of genetically modified foods.
Progress already has been made toward creating a strain of rice that has been genetically altered to contain vitamin A. Childhood blindness related to vitamin A deficiency, a serious global problem, could be dramatically reduced with the use of this new “golden rice”. Similarly high Iron containing rice variety has been created which could prove highly beneficial in combating Iron deficient Anaemia in developing countries.