How to be careful with your knees.

How to be careful with your knees and  keep the vulnerable joints healthy.

 Some important facts:
  • Injury to Knee: One of the most commonly injured ligaments in the knee, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament is responsible for about 150,000 injuries in the U.S. every year.
  • Body weight is always a problem for those with obesity. Every pound of body weight yields five pounds of force on the knee, so even 10 extra pounds can put a considerable load on those joints.
  • If your knees hurt, it’s harder to lose weight through exercise

    Knee Joint

    Knee Joint

  • It is important to remember that you make gains in fitness when you work hard and then allow your body to recover. But it is not possible usually to do hard work out every day.
  • A sudden increase in intensity or duration of exercise can cause overuse injuries from repetitive strain.  It is always advisable to go slow and steady with your exercise. Gradually increase the stress you put on your muscles and joints. Its important to give the muscles and joints rest after putting them on stress of exercise.
  • When the muscles around the kneecap, hip, and pelvis are strong, it keeps the knee stable and balanced, providing support by absorbing some of the stress exerted on the joint.
  • With regular graded exercise the joints gain flexibility and capability to with stand stress of increased load. Weak muscles and lack of flexibility are primary causes of knee injuries.
  • Tendonitis and kneecap pain are common symptoms in the stress and injury to knee.

How much Proteins you need ?

 How much Proteins you need ?
Our body needs Proteins as per body weight, age, physical activity level, and other factors.

  • Average adult man needs: 56 grams per day.
  • Adult women need: 46 grams per day.
  • Teenage boys need:  52 grams per day.
  • Infants need: 10 grams per day.

More specific recommendations, based on body weight, call for adults to get  about 8 grams of protein for every 20 pounds of body weight.

 

  • 10% to 35% percentage of your daily calories should come from protein?
  • All other things being equal, men need more protein than women.
  • Studies have shown that diets that substitute protein for carbohydrates may help people lose weight.

Chewing Food more helps in shedding weight!

Chewing Food more helps in shedding weight!
According to a new study:Chewing each mouthful of food for longer duration might help to reduce weight.

Volunteers who chewed each mouthful 40 times ate 12 % less food than those chewed just 15 times.

It is thought that chewing for a long time checks over eating as the brain is given more time to receive signals from the stomach that it is full. It also lowers the level of Ghrelin, a hormaone that controls hunger.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Most Common are:

  • Gonorrhea
  • Syphilis
  • Human Papillpmavirus (HPV) associated condyloma acuminataum.
  • Chlamydial Genital infections
  • Herpes Virus Genital infections
  • Trichomonas vaginitis
  • Chancroid
  • Granuloma Inguinale
  • Scabies
  • Louse infestation
Among women who have sex with women -  Bacterial Vaginosis.
Especially in men who have sex with men (Oral Anal)

  • Shigellosis
  • Hepatitis A, B & C.
  • Amebiasis
  • Giardiasis
  • Cryptosporidiosis
  • Salmonellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis
Both Homosexual and heterosexual are prone to HIV infections.

Tea: Few Facts

Tea: Few Facts

Drinking a few cups of tea may be good for your health. Here are few facts on Tea.

  • Tea leaves come from the Camellia sinensis plant. They contain antioxidants that counter free radicals, which can damage cells. Antioxidants may reduce or help prevent some of this damage.
  • The difference between the three main varieties of tea (green, black, and oolong) is the process used to make them. Black tea is exposed to air, or fermented, which darkens the leaves and gives them flavor. Green tea is made by heating or quickly steaming the leaves. Oolong tea leaves are partially fermented.
  • There’s no hard evidence that drinking tea can prevent cancer in people in general; many factors affect cancer risk. However, several studies have linked drinking tea to a lower risk of cancer for some people. More research is needed to define those groups.
  • Some studies show that drinking green tea may help curb a few heart disease risk factors, including body weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol absorption. However, the FDA denied a petition filed by a green tea maker that wanted to put heart-health claims on its product’s label, ruling that there wasn’t credible scientific evidence to support the claims.
  • There is some evidence that green tea may help control glucose (or blood sugar) levels, however, that hasn’t been widely tested in people. More research is needed to learn how much green tea would be needed and whether green tea also helps curb body weight and body fat.
  • Herbal teas are not made from the Camellia sinensis plant and are not really teas at all. Herbal teas are an infusion of leaves, roots, bark, seeds, or flowers from other types of plants. Common herbal teas include chamomile and mint. They are not associated with the potential health benefits of green, black, or oolong tea.
  • You get the most antioxidants from freshly brewed tea; those compounds are reduced in instant tea, decaffeinated tea, and bottled tea. Researchers have not determined how many cups of freshly brewed green tea are recommended each day, but people in Asia typically drink at least three cups daily.
  • Fresh brewing is the way to get the most antioxidants from your tea, so knowing how long to steep the tea is an important part of the process. Three to five minutes is the recommended amount of time for maximizing the benefits.
  • Iced tea often contains low to negligible amounts of catechins compared with the high concentrations found in a cup of hot tea, because adding water to brewed tea dilutes the concentration. However, iced tea and hot tea could contain approximately the same level of antioxidants if, when preparing iced tea, you use 50% more tea than when preparing a similar amount of hot tea to allow for dilution. About 85% of the tea drunk in the U.S. is iced tea.
  • Green tea contains caffeine, so pregnant women or those who are breastfeeding shouldn’t drink more than one or two servings of green tea per day, according to the American Dietetic Association. People with irregular heartbeats or anxiety disorders also should be cautious about how much caffeine they get, from green tea or other sources.
  • A Swiss study found that drinking black tea with a meal reduced iron absorption by 79% to 94% when compared with drinking water. People with an iron deficiency might consider drinking tea only between meals.
                                                                            Contents from:http://www.webmd.com
Tea and its benefits
Green Tea